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Desperado Gold All Natural tobacco


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Old 08-14-2019, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by masklofumanto View Post
You think so. Read this:

In 1900, Iowa, North Dakota, Tennessee, and Washington ban the sale of cigarettes (by 1909, 15 states banned cigarette sales). The U.S. Supreme Court upholds Tennessee's ban, one justice's opinion repeats the popular notion that "there are many cigarettes whose tobacco has been mixed with opium or some other drug, and whose wrapper has been soaked in arsenic." By 1901, 43 out of the 45 states had anti-cigarette laws of some kind on the books; Louisiana and Wyoming are the two exceptions. The 1902 Sears & Roebuck catalog (notorious for selling tonics containing hefty doses of the opiate laudanum) lists a product claimed to be the "sure cure for the tobacco habit," which will "destroy the effects of nicotine." In 1904, a New York judge sends a woman to jail for 30 days for smoking in front of her children. In 1905 the Indiana legislature passes a total cigarette ban.

But, both tobacco and nicotine are kept out of the official federal government listing of drugs, which automatically removes tobacco from the supervision of the newly created Food and Drug Administration (1906). In 1908 Canada bans the sale of tobacco to persons under 16--the ban is never enforced. The U.K. also bans tobacco sales to those under 16, based on the belief that smoking stunts growth. In 1908, New York City bans women from smoking in public. In 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court upholds New York's ban on cigarette advertisements. But in 1911 tobacco growing is allowed in England for the first time in more than 250 years. In 1914 Thomas Edison writes to Henry Ford on the health dangers of cigarettes, claiming that the injury comes from the burning wrapper paper. He admits "I employ no person who smokes cigarettes." In 1916 Henry Ford publishes an anti-cigarette pamphlet. By 1917, tobacco control laws, including smoking bans, have been repealed in most cities and states.
Thatís surprising, then how did it become so popular later despite all of these bans ?
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Aboaultan View Post
That’s surprising, then how did it become so popular later despite all of these bans ?
World War I -- the U.S. armed forces actually encouraged cigarette smoking by the soldiers. When the U.S. joins World War I, cigarette rations are included, determined by market share (a great boost to Camel). People opposed to sending cigarettes to the soldiers are accused of being "traitors" by General John Pershing, who writes "I need tobacco as much as bullets." In 1918 the War Department buys the entire output of Bull Durham tobacco.

Then, state governments realized cigarettes sales offered a great source for tax revenue: In 1924, Iowa becomes the first state government to add its own cigarette tax (2 cents a pack) to the federal excise tax (6 cents a pack). In 1927, Kansas becomes the last state to drop its ban on cigarette sales, and the Long Island Railroad grants full rights to women in smoking cars.

By the way, even in the era of all those anti-cigarette ordinances in so many states at the start of the 20th century, cigar smoking by American men was almost ubiquitous. The double standard we see today had its precedent back then. Notice, for example, that Thomas Edison's and Henry Ford's discriminatory hiring policies were only against cigarette smokers. Another possible factor: Henry Ford was a blatant racist. Many cigarette smokers in the U.S. before WWI were immigrants, whereas most natural born Americans who smoked were cigar smokers.

However, as early as 1924, Readers Digest publishes an article "Does Tobacco Injure the Human Body?" It was also Readers Digest which, in 1952, published the first article in a "popular publication" about the possible link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Smoking prevalence in the U.S., by the way, peaked in 1964, the same year as the U.S. Surgeon General's report on cigarette smoking and lung cancer.

Last edited by masklofumanto; 08-14-2019 at 10:30 AM.
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by masklofumanto View Post
World War I -- the U.S. armed forces actually encouraged cigarette smoking by the soldiers. When the U.S. joins World War I, cigarette rations are included, determined by market share (a great boost to Camel). People opposed to sending cigarettes to the soldiers are accused of being "traitors" by General John Pershing, who writes "I need tobacco as much as bullets." In 1918 the War Department buys the entire output of Bull Durham tobacco.

Then, state governments realized cigarettes sales offered a great source for tax revenue: In 1924, Iowa becomes the first state government to add its own cigarette tax (2 cents a pack) to the federal excise tax (6 cents a pack). In 1927, Kansas becomes the last state to drop its ban on cigarette sales, and the Long Island Railroad grants full rights to women in smoking cars.

By the way, even in the era of all those anti-cigarette ordinances in so many states at the start of the 20th century, cigar smoking by American men was almost ubiquitous. The double standard we see today had its precedent back then. Notice, for example, that Thomas Edison's and Henry Ford's discriminatory hiring policies were only against cigarette smokers. Another possible factor: Henry Ford was a blatant racist. Many cigarette smokers in the U.S. before WWI were immigrants, whereas most natural born Americans who smoked were cigar smokers.

However, as early as 1924, Readers Digest publishes an article "Does Tobacco Injure the Human Body?" It was also Readers Digest which, in 1952, published the first article in a "popular publication" about the possible link between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Smoking prevalence in the U.S., by the way, peaked in 1964, the same year as the U.S. Surgeon General's report on cigarette smoking and lung cancer.
This is interesting, actually smoking history in general is very interesting. When i think about it , i cant imagine how did people started smoking in the first place. I mean the idea of breathing the smoke of a plant regularly out of nowhere is very weird. I know it of course developed step by step, but why did accept it and gave money for it is fascinating, and we still do. Despite the health dangers, however i think ryo is way less harmful even though I donít have a real proof.
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Old 08-14-2019, 05:26 PM
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this article just appeared on the Daily Mail Online in UK on this very subject

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7355737/The-child-smokers-Americas-industrial-boom.html

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Old 08-17-2019, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by masklofumanto View Post
The 1902 Sears & Roebuck catalog (notorious for selling tonics containing hefty doses of the opiate laudanum) lists a product claimed to be the "sure cure for the tobacco habit," which will "destroy the effects of nicotine."
Doesn't this remind you of today's Chantix commercials?
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Old 08-17-2019, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by masklofumanto View Post
Doesn't this remind you of today's Chantix commercials?
It seems that history is really repeating itself from 100 years ago
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