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  #501 (permalink)  
Old 09-29-2019, 10:33 AM
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The painting reminds me of Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig. A roadside marker I saw while in traveling thru Minnesota
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:46 PM
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Default Sunday Dispatch #894

October 4th is the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi (1182-1226). Perhaps his best known composition is the "Canticle of Brother Sun," a religious song written in the Umbrian dialect of Italian. It is believed to be among the first works of literature, if not the first, written in the Italian language.

St. Francis is said to have composed most of the canticle in late 1224 while recovering from an illness at San Damiano, in a small cottage that had been built for him by St. Clare and other women of her Order of Poor Ladies. According to tradition, the first time it was sung in its entirety was by Francis and Brothers Angelo and Leo, two of his original companions, on Francis' deathbed, the final verse praising "Sister Death" having been added only a few minutes before.

The "Canticle of Brother Sun" is first mentioned in the "Vita Prima" of Thomas of Celano in 1228. Interestingly, Thomas of Celano reposed on the feast of St. Francis, on October 4, 1265.


Canticle of Brother Sun

Most High, all powerful, good Lord,
Yours are the praises, the glory, the honor,
and all blessing.

To You alone, Most High, do they belong,
and no man is worthy to mention Your name.

Be praised, my Lord, through all your creatures,
especially through my lord Brother Sun,
who brings the day; and you give light through him.
And he is beautiful and radiant in all his splendor!
Of you, Most High, he bears the likeness.

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Moon
and the stars, in heaven you formed them
clear and precious and beautiful.

Praised be You, my Lord, through Brother Wind,
and through the air, cloudy and serene,
and every kind of weather through which
You give sustenance to Your creatures.

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Water,
which is very useful and humble and precious and chaste.

Praised be You, my Lord, through Brother Fire,
through whom you light the night and he is beautiful
and playful and robust and strong.

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Mother Earth,
who sustains us and governs us and who produces
varied fruits with colored flowers and herbs.

Praised be You, my Lord,
through those who give pardon for Your love,
and bear infirmity and tribulation.

Blessed are those who endure in peace
for by You, Most High, they shall be crowned.

Praised be You, my Lord,
through our Sister Bodily Death,
from whom no living man can escape.

Woe to those who die in mortal sin.
Blessed are those whom death will
find in Your most holy will,
for the second death shall do them no harm.

Praise and bless my Lord,
and give Him thanks
and serve Him with great humility.


St. Francis' Sermon to the Birds, painting by Giotto di Bondone (1266-1337)

Last edited by masklofumanto; 10-04-2019 at 09:24 PM.
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Old 10-11-2019, 07:51 PM
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Default Sunday Dispatch #895

“Those who gave thee a body, furnished it with weakness; but He who gave thee Soul, armed thee with resolution. Employ it, and thou art wise; be wise and thou art happy.”
― Akhenaten, Pharaoh of Egypt (d. 1336 BC)

Akhenaten was an Egyptian Pharaoh who ruled during the 18th Dynasty of the New Kingdom period of Ancient Egypt. He is famous for changing the traditional religion of Egypt from the worship of many gods to the worship of a single god named Aten. He is credited with being the world's first known monotheist.


Painting of Pharaoh Akhenaten by Winifred Mabel Brunton (1880-1959), a South African Egyptologist and painter.

Last edited by masklofumanto; 10-11-2019 at 09:51 PM. Reason: added title
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Old 10-26-2019, 12:00 AM
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Default Sunday Dispatch #896

“It is absurd for the Evolutionist to complain that it is unthinkable for an admittedly unthinkable God to make everything out of nothing, and then pretend that it is more thinkable that nothing should turn itself into everything.”
― G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

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Old 11-02-2019, 09:57 AM
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Default Sunday Dispatch #897

"Life is like a piano. What you get out of it depends on how you play it."
Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


Last edited by masklofumanto; 11-05-2019 at 12:50 AM.
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Old 11-05-2019, 12:29 AM
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Default Sunday Dispatch "Special Edition"

November 3rd was the feast of St. Winifred (c. 600 - c. 660), one of the major saints of the British Isles, so I've added a "special edition" to the Sunday Dispatch in her honor.

Saint Winifred was a Welsh virgin-martyr of the 7th century. Her cult was celebrated as early as the 8th century, but became popular in England in the 12th, when her biography was first written down. A healing spring at the traditional site of her decapitation and restoration is now a shrine and pilgrimage site called St. Winifred's Well in Holywell, Flintshire, Wales and known as "the Lourdes of Wales".

According to legend, St. Winifred was the daughter of a chieftain of Tegeingl, Welsh nobleman, Tyfid ap Eiludd. Her mother was Wenlo, a sister of St. Beuno and a member of a family closely connected with the kings of south Wales. Her suitor, Caradog, was enraged when she decided to become a nun, and decapitated her.

A healing spring appeared at where her head fell. Winifred's head was subsequently rejoined to her body due to the efforts of St. Beuno, and she was restored to life. Seeing the murderer leaning on his sword with an insolent and defiant air, St. Beuno invoked the chastisement of heaven, and Caradog fell dead on the spot, the popular belief being that the ground opened and swallowed him.

St. Beuno left Holywell, and returned to Caernarvon. Before he left the tradition is that he seated himself upon the stone, which now stands in the outer well pool, and there promised in the name of God "that whosoever on that spot should thrice ask for a benefit from God in the name of St. Winifred would obtain the grace he asked if it was for the good of his soul."

After eight years spent at Holywell, Winifred received an inspiration to leave the convent and retire inland. Accordingly, St. Winifred went upon her pilgrimage to seek for a place of rest. Ultimately she arrived at Gwytherin near the source of the River Elwy. She later became a nun and abbess at Gwytherin in Denbighshire.

St. Winifred is mostly venerated in England, not in Wales, which led Caesar Baronius to list her as an "English saint" in his Roman Martyrology of 1584. In 1138, relics were carried to Shrewsbury Abbey to form the basis of an elaborate shrine. To this day, pilgrims still come to Winifred's spring in Wales.

The details of St. Winifred's life are taken from the work of the British monk, Elerius, a contemporary of the saint, and also the more popular hagiography written (in 1130) by Prior Robert of Shrewsbury. Prior Robert is generally credited with greatly promoting the cult of St. Winifred by translating her relics from Gwytherin to Shrewsbury Abbey and writing the most influential life of the saint.

The moving of Winifred's bones to Shrewsbury is fictionalized in "A Morbid Taste for Bones", the first of Ellis Peters' Brother Cadfael novels, with the plot twist that her bones are secretly left in Wales, and someone else is put into the shrine. St. Winifred is an important "character" in all the books in the Brother Cadfael series. The celebration of her Feast Day provides the setting for two of the novels, "The Rose Rent" and "The Pilgrim of Hate". The casket is actually stolen from its shrine in "The Holy Thief", and the campaign to find and restore it propels the action. Throughout the series, the protagonist, Brother Cadfael -- a Welsh monk at the English monastery at Shrewsbury -- has a kind of "special understanding" with the saint, whom he affectionately calls "The Girl".


Statue of St. Winifred


St. Winifred's Well

Last edited by masklofumanto; 11-05-2019 at 01:00 AM.
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Old 11-09-2019, 07:29 AM
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Default Sunday Dispatch #898

Luke 10:25-37
Behold, a lawyer stood up to put him to the test, saying, “Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?” He said to him, “What is written in the law? How do you read?” And he answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have answered right; do this, and you will live.” But he, desiring to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and he fell among robbers, who stripped him and beat him, and departed, leaving him half dead. Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him he passed by on the other side. So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. But a Samaritan, as he journeyed, came to where he was; and when he saw him, he had compassion, and went to him and bound up his wounds, pouring on oil and wine; then he set him on his own beast and brought him to an inn, and took care of him. And the next day he took out two denarii and gave them to the innkeeper, saying, ‘Take care of him; and whatever more you spend, I will repay you when I come back.’ Which of these three, do you think, proved neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?” He said, “The one who showed mercy on him.” And Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”


"The Good Samaritan," painting by Eugene Delacroix (1798-1863)
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