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How long did it take you to realize addiction had set in


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Old 06-12-2014, 07:42 AM
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Thumbs up How long did it take you to realize addiction had set in

I only started smoking 6 month ago and now average about 15 cigarettes a day and the other day when I couldn't smoke when visiting friends and I lit up as soon as I got outside I realized I needed that cigarette real bad so addiction must have set in.
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Old 06-12-2014, 09:16 AM
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Back when I started smoking, nobody -- at least so far as I can remember -- called smoking an "addiction," it was a "habit." Yeah, everyone knew it was a tough habit to break, but "addiction" back then meant a physiological dependence on a drug in which cessation would cause withdrawal symptoms requiring hospitalization. So, to answer the question, it never dawned on me that I was "addicted." How long it took for me to realize that I was "hooked," which I guess is how I might at most have thought of it, isn't so easy to answer. I tried my first cigarette at 13, and for about 15 months alternated between smoking and not-smoking, so while I was always drawn back to smoking again, I wouldn't have thought that I had crossed some kind of line from which there was no turning back. When I started smoking daily at 15, I knowingly and willingly picked up a habit. I suppose at some point I must have known it would be difficult to stop smoking, but I wouldn't have known precisely when that was because I had no intention of quitting and didn't try to do so. I should also add that back then you could smoke almost anywhere, so you didn't have to suffer cravings for long, though I do remember that all I could think about when I was in geometry class was how much I wanted a cigarette and would light up while going down the stairs (that class was on third floor) before I was even out the door of the building -- but that may have had more to do with how boring I found geometry than how "addicted" I was to smoking (I was 15 at the time).

Last edited by masklofumanto; 09-24-2014 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 06-12-2014, 09:23 AM
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About a year after starting when my dad and I went to a carshow and since he didn't know I smoked yet, I couldn't smoke, and watching him light up was pure torture. That is when I realized I was hooked and now needed to smoke to be happy. As I started smoking with the intension of becoming a smoker, I actually was happy I now was one for sure.
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Old 06-12-2014, 09:37 AM
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Like Masklofumanto, I started smoking when it was still a habit. Sure they said you would get hooked, but addiction and smoking didn't go together yet.
When I first tried smoking I would do so very irregular, not smoking for months at a time because I wasn't sure if I really liked it enough to really be a smoker. At about 16 I had made up my mind and like Masklofumanto also said I knowingly and willingly picked up a habit by making sure I smoked at least one cigarette more than the day before until I was a pack a day smoker. Sure there were times during class that I could have had a smoke but as soon as I got into the hallway after class I would light up, smoking was still allowed everywhere at school. Only teachers were allowed to smoke in class. So to tell you the truth, I really don't know when I was addicted. I am pretty sure before I was smoking a pack a day when I decided I now was truly hooked on my new habit and really proud of myself too.

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Old 06-12-2014, 09:51 AM
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As both Masklofumanto and Nicnick wrote you didn't get addicted when I started smoking.
In health class they told us not to start smoking because it was a filthy habit to have and you would get hooked and stopping would be hard. As I started smoking because I was the only non-smoker left in the family, I had no intention of stopping anyway so never really thought about it, to me it was and still is a great habit to have. When my dad found out I smoked all he said was, so now the whole family is hooked on cigarettes, which didn't seem to be a bad thing at all.
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Old 06-12-2014, 11:18 AM
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I started smoking when it wasn't referred to as an addiction but rather a habit what was hard to give up - like eating chocolate for example!!

I didn't go through a slow transition from smoking a few cigarettes a day to a few packs, but rather just went straight to a pack a day and from there up to 2-3. I suppose you could say that from the day I started I was a heavy smoker.

I think subconsciously I knew within a few months of starting that I was addicted but it didn't bother me at all then. In fact it made it more pleasurable to have a cigarette after a while of not smoking and to feel the relief of withdrawal symptoms going away.

My addiction doesn't bother me to this day, except for those occasions when I cannot smoke for hours on end, but even then I can get through it if I need to. Ironically, I actually have pretty good will power!!
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Old 06-13-2014, 08:46 AM
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I believe it's an abuse of medical terminology to describe smoking as an "addiction" for political purposes. Compared to withdrawal from drugs like heroin, or even alcohol dependence, from a clinical perspective, it's a "walk in the park" to stop smoking. About 30 years ago I stopped for a year, largely to please someone else, and when I've had to travel after smoking was banned in airports and TSA made it an ungodly hassle to run out for a quick smoke between flights, I don't even really think about smoking.

I chose to smoke and still do, but it's something I like to do, like playing golf or having a good meal. I could, if necessary do without things I enjoy, but have no desire to do so.
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Old 06-13-2014, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by wbealsd View Post
I believe it's an abuse of medical terminology to describe smoking as an "addiction" for political purposes.
It's part of a general trend of redefining language, often for political or ideological purposes. It seems to me George Orwell was on to something in 1984, at least when it comes to redefining terminology, rewriting history, and inventing "facts." You don't have to use terror to control people when you've already gained control of their thinking, and controlling language goes a long way in that regard, because the understanding of the terms, and therefore the concepts, used in thought have already been manipulated.

What strikes me as downright inane is the change in terminology from "Personnel" to "Human Resources," which suggests that human beings are regarded as commodities to be used or consumed, rather than as persons who exist for their own sake with rights to be respected. This, to me, is just one blaring example of the move towards collectivism, and of making people into virtual wards of the State, that is now happening even in the Western "democracies."

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Old 06-13-2014, 06:06 PM
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Especially, in Western "democracies." The leadership of the EU barely bothers to conceal it's distaste for the people it wants to rule (oops, "govern").
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Old 06-14-2014, 08:57 AM
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Addiction isn't a word that features in my smoking vocabulary.Satisfaction,enjoyment,pleasure,taste/flavour and sensation certainly do!
OK-after 40+ years of regular,daily smoking my body is fully primed and well conditioned to the life of a confirmed smoker.Being geared up to a daily "routine" is a more appropriate term to describe my smoking.For me smoking includes not only the enjoyable physical sensation it delivers to my system but also the "extras" such as buying a new pack,opening it up and checking all the cigarettes are fresh,firm and round.I guess it's the totality of the experience which defines me as a smoker.
Returning to "addiction" -if I know in advance that I won't be able to smoke for an extended period(say on a flight as one example) then like Marlborofan points out, it doesn't bother me particularly as nobody else is smoking.I do admit though to feeling uncomfortable if in the rare instances I find myself unexpectedly without a cigarette when I wish to smoke and the opportunity/desire arises-say forgetting my cigarettes or running out."Routine disruption" is a more apt term to employ in such situations rather than "addiction".In fact smoking for me is no different to drinking coffee!!
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Last edited by filter man; 06-14-2014 at 09:09 AM.
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